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MONDAY MANI

Protecting Yourself and The Client

 

 

Will the client entering the salon be at ease by what they see?  All things neat and clean, in their place and dust-free?  A sense of confidence is offered when cleanliness is what is seen first upon entering the manicure or pedicure area.  At some point, the method of sanitation may be discussed.

Where do germs live?  How do we protect ourselves from them?  Germs are everywhere.  Some we need and some we don’t.  The number one and most effective way to protect ourselves and others from the spread of any type of germ or bacteria is thorough hand washing.  We have left the soak and water days and gone to the pocket hand sanitizer to answer the call of convenience and not necessarily full protection.  We have relegated our protection to drying and harsh chemicals.  It is much safer and better for our skin if we would just take a little time and wash with warm soapy water.  As Mother Dear use to say, ‘Put some elbow grease into it.’  We don’t have time nor the elbow grease.

The Nail Technician is responsible for the protection of each and every client that he/she may touch and perform any type of beautification.  The porous and non-porous items used must be washed, dried and sanitized/disinfected wet and dry) according to the state law.

Happy Pampering!

 

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MONDAY MANI

CUTICLES!   CUTICLES!   CUTICLES!

(The Russian Manicure Continued)

 

The Danger

Some nail techs justify their actions by claiming to use only sterile or disposable implements. They naively believe this prevents infections. Wrong!  Whenever the living skin is cut or abraded, the damaged area is more susceptible to infection for many hours or even days. The potential risk of infection will remain until the body heals.

Any bit spinning at thousands of RPM and placed against the skin surface will abrade the skin no matter the light touch.

This abrasion can reduce the skin’s effectiveness as a germ and bacteria barrier. It also makes it easier for infections and adverse skin reactions to occur.

Ask for that the drill not be used during your nail service especially on your skin.  ~~  Nail Care HQ

 

 

MONDAY MANI

CUTICLES!   CUTICLES!   CUTICLES!

 

Not one left any where!  The Russian Manicure.  That’s the nouveau wave of cuticle damage, in my opinion, that is hitting our industry with the potential of thousands of run around victims in the future.  Damaged cuticles.

That’s the look of this new type manicure.  Remove ALL cuticle!  Cuticles are not to be cut or E-filed for beautification.

I’m talking about the Russian Manicure.  Some claim the manicure/polish lasts longer.  One professional even said, ‘…the gels/acrylics last longer cause you can get right up under the cuticle.’  What!?  When did putting product under the cuticle become ok for the well-being of the client’s skin and nails and possibly overall health.  If the product can be placed underneath the cuticle, so can germs and bacteria.

What Is It?

Some people around the globe are teaching a highly risky technique that goes by several different names including, the “Russian” or “Equipment”  or “Dry” or “E-File” manicure. 

The process is to use an electronic file with very fine bits to file off the dead/dry skin or cuticle around the nail plate. Tissue is also filed from the nail plate.

This isn’t a new look.  It resulted in the condition called “run around” when we didn’t know of the long-term effects of cutting off live tissue/cuticle.  The result was the  cuticles are then permanently puffy and tender because the nail techs took off the living tissue(cuticle)the proximal fold or the eponychium during the manicure.

The  proximal fold, lateral side walls, and the hyponychium create the 4 required guardian seals to protect the nail bed and matrix from harmful germs and bacteria.  We never want to cut or sand down live skin!  ~~Nail Care HQ

To be continued…

MONDAY MANI

Do Vitamin Deficiencies Cause Fingernail Ridges?

 

Your fingernails can say a lot about you, including whether or not you’re consuming enough vitamins and minerals. Getting insufficient amounts of certain B-complex vitamins can cause ridges in your fingernails. However, lack of certain minerals and protein, as well as various health conditions, can cause these lines in fingernails too.

White spots and Vertical ridges on the fingernails symptomsDeficiencies in zinc, folic acid, iron and protein may cause fingernail ridges. The appearance of your nails may also indicate that you’re experiencing other health issues, like psoriasis or kidney problems. ~LivingStrong

**Should you have any issues or concerns with skin, hair or nails, please consult your physician.

MONDAY MANI ~ Nail Anatomy

*The cuticle and proximal nail fold is often called “the cuticle” and is often cut as part of the manicure service.  The cuticle should be removed by soaking the fingers in warm soapy water, and a cuticle remover used to help lift the sticky cuticle from the nail plate by pushing and lightly scraping(…yes) but not cutting. 

*Please see photo

 

 

 

Fingernail: A fingernail is produced by living skin cells in the finger. A fingernail consists of several parts including the nail plate (the visible part of the nail), the nail bed (the skin beneath the nail plate), the cuticle (the tissue that overlaps the plate and rims the base of the nail), the nail grooves (the skin folds that frame and support the nail on three sides), the lunula (the whitish half-moon at the base of the nail) and the matrix (the hidden part of the nail unit under the cuticle).

THE NAIL=Onyx

An appendage of the skin, this horny,translucent plate protects the tips of fingers and toes.  The nail is composed mainly of keratin.  A healthy nail should be whitish and translucent in appearance, with the pinkish color of the nail bed below showing through.

 

Monday Mani

Cuticles are to be cared for even in summer.  Not only are the cuticles being over-exposed to more harsh chemicals but are going from wet to dry more often for most.  We tend to wash and eat seasonal fruit and veggies more through out the summer months.  Therefore, light oils, such as jojoba, sweet almond, coconut oil and even evoo may be applied often to dry and cracked cuticles.  It is best to apply these oils right after water exposure to trap the moisture in the outer skin layer and these oils will also absorb into dry skin.

 

And, of course, damaged cuticles will look better after these oils are applied.